Cosmic Disclosure: Initiation Into Secret Projects

Season 11, Episode 5


admin    20 Jun 2018

s11e5_initiation_into_secret_projects_16x9.jpg

David Wilcock: Welcome to “Cosmic Disclosure”. I'm your host, David Wilcock, and I am here with Emery Smith.

Since information in these classified programs is so compartmentalized and difficult to get, how do you actually achieve a level of knowledge within the classified world?

What does it take to get a security clearance? And how do you progress through these various stages and ranks to get to the good stuff?

Emery, welcome back.

Emery Smith: Thanks, Dave.

David: So the first thing I'd like to start with is an audience question. And that is: how did you train to become a technician? What was your training? How did you get this training?

So could you please give us more information on that exactly?

Emery: Sure. And this is nothing secret or different than any other person that joins the military that picks a classification they want to go into.

1 Emery Smith 3

I went into surgical technology. From there, you get different classifications because you can completely continue your education with the Community College of the Air Force and their technician programs, such as after basic training, which I only had to do a few weeks of because of my prior military training as a teenager.

I was immediately shipped to Sheppard Air Force Base in Wichita Falls, Texas.

And from there, I went through an extensive training of surgical technology and also surgical first assisting.

From there, you get deployed to another area, such as I was deployed to an air transportable hospital at England Air Force Base, Louisiana.

And that's one of these places where out of just a couple C-130s, we can drop down a whole hospital, have it ready to go in 24 hours anywhere in the world.

So that was my training just for the basics of the surgical technology, and that's where I learned a lot of this and trained under many great physicians.

And from there, I went to Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico and trained through the hospital system there.

You're always in training, so you know. There's always new things coming out. There's always new techniques.

A good example of this is just doing CPR. And CPR last year and the year before . . . it keeps changing. Maybe it's a different amount of breaths or a different amount of chest compressions.

So you have to be allocated and get your CMEs accredited for doctors and nurses and all medical people. It's an ongoing, continuing education program.

So for me, it was great because I'm high energy, and I wanted to learn more and more and more. And the Air Force just kept feeding it to me.

David: So given that this was obviously very intensive training, did you also receive knowledge that would not be given to people if they went to a university?

Emery: That's absolutely correct. The things that I have learned through the military-industrial complex and the military itself – because I was doing both civilian and military work at the same time I was on active duty – the types of training and education is not available to the general public, okay? And that's because of these different types and compartmentalized programs that I was working with.

You HAD to get additional training. You had to take different courses and things with electromagnetics and sciences, even with medicine, that were not out yet.

And I've noticed that usually after five or 10 years, some of these things would go out, like harmonic scalpels. They were using that in the early '80s, and it really didn't come forward until the early '90s. and then it became mainstream.

2 Harmonic Scalpel

David: In a previous episode, you mentioned that you had some kind of high school program that started you in the military.

Emery: Sure, yep.

David: So could you delineate for us: how old were you when you got into the military? And how long did it take before you started to get invited into secret projects?

Emery: The first thing I joined was Civil Air Patrol at the age of 13. It's an auxiliary to the Air Force. It's in many, many communities. It's not a secret.

Now, during Civil Air Patrol, I also took Army ROTC. And that's just a normal thing that's in most high schools.

And so I had a really good affinity for the Army, because during the four years, I did a lot of encampments. Some of these are two weeks to a month long.

Some of the survival missions of the Civil Air Patrol could be up to a week long in very desolate areas of the world. And they teach you things, like I said, first aid and search and rescue.

So search and rescue is the biggest thing: how do you utilize an ELT, Emergency Locating Transmitting device, which is located in every aircraft in the tail section and also every boat.

David: At what point did you start to encounter information that was classified enough that it would really trip people out if they hadn't already ever heard about this before?

Emery: Probably my sophomore year. We all take these tests called the ASVAB test [Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test].

David: Right.

Emery: It gives you job placement in the military. But I was getting additional ASVABs, where I had to travel to MacDill Air Force Base and take a test every weekend.

My Army ROTC commander says this is just additional things they ask for some people. And actually, I thought maybe I didn't do good on the ASVAB, but it wasn't. It actually . . . Later on, I found out that these are tests additionally they test children with to measure their consciousness and collective state.

David: So what did these tests lead to if you got positive results? Did you end up in a briefing? Did somebody hand you a stack of documents?

Emery: Nothing really was strange up until I went to England Air Force Base, my first duty assignment in Alexandria, Louisiana, right next to Fort Polk Army Base.

And then from there, it was really interesting that, “Oh, my gosh. You're now being assigned to Kirtland Air Force Base – out of nowhere.” And everybody else went somewhere else – all my other colleagues and airmen.

And THAT'S where things started taking off – when I went to Kirtland. And I had a really great feeling about this move.

So I was excited to get out of the swamp, get into the mountains in the higher atmosphere.

David: Did somebody give you like a knowing look or a wink or a pat on the shoulder?

Emery: Yeah. They treated me at Kirtland Air Force Base a lot better than they did at England Air Force Base. And I knew there was something going on, because when I went there, I immediately was in charge, directly and indirectly, of maybe 30 different technicians . . .

David: Wow!

Emery: . . . and surgical specialists, because I already had a lot of experience. And the next thing you know is when they approached me and said . . . one of the commanders there approached me and said, “Hey, we have additional things that you could work on if you want – additional trainings and additional education, if you'd like. And we would actually allow you to leave work early to do these things.” And so I did.

And some of these were just trauma training, air evac training, flight medicine, things like this.

And that's how I knew right away, “Wow! This is going to be a really great opportunity for me not only to get more ribbons but to get promoted faster and be part of other compartmentalized programs.”

And that's when they came to me and asked me, after I did another additional training, “Would you like to moonlight for this new wing of the military that has to do with harvesting organs?”

And I was, of course, more than welcome to sign that paper because I wanted, of course, to be more financially stable. You don't get paid anything in the military, as you know. And it was easy for me to . . .I had so much energy, it was easy for me to start a job at 6:00 p.m. and work to 1:00 a.m. and then get back up at 4:00 a.m. and be at work at 5:00 p.m. and do this over and over. [Emery may have meant 5:00 a.m..]

I was in great shape back then, because I was working out two hours a day, and the training alone was amazing.

And a lot of neat travel was involved with these things, having to go to different Air Force bases, like Holloman Air Force Base and White Sands Missile Range and some others that I won't talk about.

And it just opened up, I think, the area for me to slip into this compartmentalized program. And that's when I realized I was not going to be doing organ harvesting on soldiers.

David: So you described in previous episodes that the original nine months of your time doing these autopsies were kind of boring little squares or rectangles of tissue.

Emery: Correct.

David: So did anybody ever actually give you a briefing? Because a lot of the insiders I've spoken to . . . let me just say the context.

They get sat down at some point. They get shown weird films, or they get told things. Or they are given a huge stack of paper to read. And that's a commonality in a lot of these stories.

So I'm wondering, if you're getting these little squares of tissue, had you been given any of that kind of a briefing before that made you at all anticipate that this might be something weird?

Emery: It really wasn't until maybe six or nine months into the program where I started getting special classes, we'll say, and instruction that in order for you to work in a different operating room or a different area or different wing, you would have to go through these training instruction courses.

And it would cover things. And the word I did hear was “tissue other than Earth origin”.

David: They used that term?

Emery: Yes, they did.

David: Really?

Emery: And that's how I knew later on what was really taking place here. Whether it was true or not, the stuff I was working on definitely did not look like any type of human bodily material or fluid by far.

David: Were these no-questions briefings? Or were you able to interact with someone who was telling you things?

Emery: Once every two weeks, you would get an actual briefing from a head scientist or a commander.

3 Emery And David

But most instructions – like as far as getting upgraded to go somewhere else and you have to take different courses through them, which are very short courses anywhere from two to three hours of the things that you might encounter or work on – definitely pointed into the direction of extraterrestrial genetics and DNA and tissues.

David: Well, I know when I was in college and a good friend of mine had his physics professor, the head of the department, tell him NASA KNEW we were not alone, that the Roswell crash was real, that it was common knowledge in the higher echelons, that he worked there in the 1970s.

My mind exploded with questions. I read 300 books in the last three years I was in school, so 100 books a year – two books a week – all on this kind of stuff.

I would imagine – at least if you were me – the fire of curiosity that would have been ignited in your mind, the desire to just want to interrogate: “What do you mean tissue of non-Earth origin? Where are they from? What kind of craft did they come in? What's their agenda? Are they trying to kill us? Are they trying to help us? Are they the gods that we see in the Sumerian cuneiform tablets?”

Emery: Right.

David: Did you ask these kind of questions?

Emery: Absolutely not, because I would not be part of the program if I did at that early of a stage.

David: Really?

Emery: Later on, it was a little different. They got a little bit more lax after you've been with them for three years.

Things are very more lackadaisical where the team will share with you information like, “We've heard it came from this system. We heard . . . you know, because we've seen this before with our prior notes from 10 or 20 years ago because of these different types of rivets – you know, I'm just saying for an example – or these types of mechanics or these types of energies.

Especially frequencies was their big thing – monitoring frequencies of DNA cells, craft and all this. And THAT is how they were building their encyclopedia of all these different tissue samples, all these different extraterrestrial beings.

So it was very captivating. And, yes, for me, it was addictive. I was addicted to it. I WANTED to go to work. I WANTED to see the next thing. I WANTED to ask questions but couldn't, but hoped maybe I would be brought onto another program through working on this being, that since I worked on it and was comfortable with it, that they would show me the craft it came in, you know, things like this.

David: Did they ever make mistakes? Did they accidentally let you know something that they didn't really want you to know?

Emery: Always. Constantly.

David: Really?

Emery: Yes.

David: Like what would be a mistake?

Emery: A mistake would be to have the technicians in a meeting where the meeting was really just for the managers of that body or of that device or of that craft.

So there were many times where they cut the meeting short, and we would have to leave the room, and the people that were running that operating room or that piece of equipment or extraterrestrial autopsy would be informed of many more things of information, such as later on I found out where they came from, like what exact planet they came from, what system they came from. Are they dimensional, interdimensional? Are they the five-star, and why is that?

David: The human shape with the head, two arms, two legs.

Emery: The human shape. And if not, why aren't they five-star? Because they were maybe developed by these ETs.

There were many ETs that we found that had pets with them and extraterrestrial pets that we later coined and were trying to put a species to that . . . a separation. And they're also from the same system.

And there were actually extraterrestrials that had a species that were transporting LARGE beings, but they were not extraterrestrials. They were like . . . We would see elephants and things like this . . . that they did not come from their system.

So maybe they were poaching these things or bringing them back or whatnot. I couldn't elaborate.

Because until you get to that level to know almost everything, you really have to be in there a very long time. And I, unfortunately, left at a very early time.

David: So let's try to delve in a little bit more to the, if you will, hierarchy of a place like Kirtland Air Force Base where things started to get interesting for you.

Obviously, you end up getting deeply enmeshed in this system of clearance, classification, access, what doors does your key card open, or whatever kind of thing it is you have there.

So could you kind of break down for us: what are the different tiers, the different levels of clearance? And could there be people on the base who have no frickin' idea what's really going on there?

Emery: Absolutely. People have to understand, too, on the base, when people are like, “Well, he's on Kirtland Air Force Base” . . . and Sandia Lab Base is on Kirtland Air Force Base. It has its own security and everything.

And all those sublevels down there are also contracted out by many different corporations of the military-industrial complex. So it's not United States Air Force doing this.

David: Right.

Emery: We're the security for that facility.

And the Army is the security for that facility on Army bases. They DO NOT KNOW ANYTHING of what's going on in there.

They know it's top secret. They know it could be harmful if any of the information got out. It could be detrimental to Americans. We could lose a HUGE rocket program just if the information got out to our enemies.

So there's different classifications of who owns these different types of levels of laboratories and whatnot and the different testing going on.

Now, getting back to what you just said, it's usually three to four months when you're working with these types of programs, through my experience only with medical, that you would have to really stick to the rules and regulations, which are really basic at first.

You can't talk to anybody. You can't tell anybody. You're not allowed to be on any types of drugs or alcohol. You can't . . . You're tested every two weeks.

So there's like these restrictions for me at that time that it was a really great shoe-in, because I didn't have to do anything. All I had to do was show up. All I had to do was work and then leave.

And after every four months, you get one up. It's called a “one up”. And “one up” means you're going to get another security clearance if they do a report on you that you did what you're supposed to do. And background checks constantly – everything.

If you get pulled over for a speeding ticket, you best be on the phone and let them know. You have to tell them within six to eight hours if anything that you did was wrong, if you got arrested or got a speeding ticket – just little things – or if you're not getting along with your commander with your active duty job, any little things, or if you're getting harassed by active duty members, which I was getting harassed because they didn't understand why I was only working 75% of the shift. But I was being pulled into other compartmentalized programs.

They would sometimes base it off of an injury to tell the commanders, because they were really tight, but the commanders don't know. All they know is . . . like one of my buddies. He was pulled out because he spoke a couple different languages. So his excuse to work in these programs was he was a linguistics expert. So they would do these things.

And they would actually lie to my military non-commissioned officer saying, “Well, we need him because he has to decipher this because he was Polish or he was German or Russian.”

And so they were really good about getting around it. And then no one really asked after a while.

David: You brought up lying, and that made me think of something else. If you have Air Force and Army soldiers essentially working security knowing something top secret is going on but not knowing what it is, was there some type of disinformation that was planted to them to satisfy their curiosity but might not have been anywhere near as interesting as what it really was?

Emery: They would do that if they suspected someone was starting . . . you know, someone was leaking information. Absolutely. As soon as information is leaked or they see security guards talking or inappropriate talking on the radios or cell phones or mobiles, they would immediately send out a disinformation campaign and then wrap it up by the end of the week saying, “Oh, that was just because of this, this or this.”

But then it would really get everyone's energy . . . “Oh, my goodness. This thing was there. We saw it, and it escaped.”

But no, it really didn't, because this was just someone's pet tiger that we had in there that was used for testing drugs on.

You know, these weird things would happen all the time, so they would really try to hide it.

And if there was actually a person that visualized something, then they would end up being killed.

David: So do you think that these Army and Air Force personnel had any ability to even imagine what they were actually sitting on?

Emery: No. No. They're young cadets, young soldiers, that are just waiting to get off shift so they can go work out or have a good time. They kept it like that for a good reason.

And they would not be debriefed on anything – the soldiers that were checking you in, the soldiers that were allowing you to go through the gate. Absolutely not.

David: You mentioned clearances going one up every four months. Could you give us some idea of what those clearances are? Let's get a little bit more specific about that. Like are there . . . Is it an alphanumeric code? Is there a name for it?

Emery: Yeah. I mean, there's a lot of pop culture stuff you see online – people talking about different things, people are referring to me as, “He had 'umbra classification'”, which is an old term we don't use anymore.

And now it's more like levels of, numeric levels of, Alpha 22, Beta 17. And they have a whole slew of that.

And all those refer to different types of bases and different types of work you do.

You know, I made up to level Alpha 22, and that's all I know. There was no pop culture term back then for that. I was just an A22.

David: The letters corresponded to a particular base?

Emery: To a particular unit within the base.

David: Oh!

Emery: So there might be energy testing, aircraft testing, biological testing, all these different things. And the first letter doesn't mean anything. It's just a letter that when you came in, this is where your program is. And it can change.

It actually could change to a different letter and different number if you got transferred to another base or a different project.

For me, I was pretty consolidated because all my stuff was medical, and I kind of stayed with that.

I did get to work on some aircraft, but more like taking specimens from aircraft, not learning the propulsion systems of those aircraft.

David: So an A22 in one base could be completely different than an A22 in another base.

Emery: No, it's standard in North America.

David: Oh, it is?

Emery: Yeah. It's different than Europe and Australia. They have their own thing. But you would have clinicians, physicians, and extraterrestrials in your base that were from these bases. And they had different markings and different codes and names.

David: So would you wear something that said “A22”?

Emery: No. No. It's on your band.

David: Right.

Emery: Remember the band?

David: You mentioned the band before.

Emery: Everything's on the band.

David: So they might not want other people on the base to know what your rank is.

Emery: No! That's a really bad thing because you could trick someone into telling you something if they thought you were classified.

David: Oh!

Emery: Yes, and that would be really bad, and that has happened.

David: Wow!

Emery: And they have . . . Yeah, they didn't make it.

David: What you're describing here is so seemingly fantastic that for most people watching the show, this would be only approachable as science fiction.

Maybe they want to believe you, but something holds them back from really accepting that this is true.

Now for me, the scope of what you're saying, the complexity of what you're saying, that's when I know somebody is real, because you can't make that up. It's too dense.

What you're talking about here . . . clearly you're giving up some things. You're sacrificing some things.

You're sacrificing the ability to talk to people about this. You can't even have friends. Like, you don't get to ask questions.

So could you explain some of the sacrifices that you've been through in this amazing environment?

Emery: The technology that I was working on and the different projects that I was included in can cure the world's water problem. It can clean up Fukushima in seven days. It can get all that trash off the coast of China, Japan – hundreds of acres of this stuff.

And personally, myself with my family coming down with cancer, let's say – my mother. This could have all been avoided if they would just release this information.

So I came to a point after working on zero-point energy devices and getting one to actually operate and getting it validated by a few laboratories that my life started getting threatened. And it wasn't because of the extraterrestrial stuff.

It was because I was possibly . . . they thought maybe I was going to bring something out to the public without the knowledge of them.

So I'm very compassionate about getting this stuff out. And I really thought and feel that my life is in a little bit of danger with all the threats going on and the phone calls and the constant harassment. You can't have a normal life like this.

Your family is at jeopardy. Your wife is at jeopardy. Your friends are at jeopardy. People don't want to be associated with you.

My colleagues through many of my major corporations turned on me because they didn't want to . . . even though I'm a 50% owner of a corporation, they just stood back and said, “We don't want this to reflect on the corporation's belief system” – that extraterrestrials exist and zero-point energy and all these crazy things . . . unless they're making billions of dollars off it.

So it shows that they're just so non-integrous people that are looking at just to make money off certain things and don't want anything to do with it.

And there's people that are just . . . They feel that if they're associated with me that they . . . you know, their lives would put at risk.

So it's a lot of weight to carry on your shoulders, but I'm not stopping just because someone's harassing me or someone's trying to kill me.

I get all these remarks online. There's a couple of people that don't agree. You don't have to agree. I'm not telling you to agree.

I'm telling you my story. I'm telling it truthfully, and I'm telling you: go out for yourself and find out, because it's the only way you're really going to believe it. And that's what I did.

David: Well, I want to thank you for your bravery in coming forward like this.

Something flashed in my head as you were talking, and that is going back to the base, and we were talking about sacrifices.

I'm curious if there was ever a scene where, for example, a guy comes up to you, and he really shouldn't be talking to you. And he's all nervous, and he's looking around. And he's telling you something that he shouldn't.

Did something like that ever happen, or was it so locked down that it was impossible?

Emery: Well, after being in there over many years, people do start to open up. We start knowing, okay, this person has been here this long. They obviously are not going to say the wrong thing, or they'll be able to hold a secret.

And you're still not allowed to fraternize with anybody from any . . . You know, you can't be a friend of someone. You can't date someone in this lab. It's really that strict.

David: Well, Emery, I really want to thank you for what you're doing here. The promise of where this technology can take us as a world I think makes it worth it for both of us to put our lives on the line for this show.

And I want to thank you for watching. This is “Cosmic Disclosure” with David Wilcock and our guest, Emery Smith.


Usage Policy: Please post 1/3 of this article and a link back to this page for the remainder of the article. Other portions can be quoted from. It would be appreciated if all those who re-post this information would follow this standard.

Loading...